* whatever political connotations the term 'northern Nigeria' may carry, here I use it to denote a generously defined geographical region situated somewhat in the north of Nigeria ... equally, my use of the term ‘local’ is in no way intended to be derogative but, in the tradition of British anthropology, refers to culture as it is lived in a particular locality ...

04 April 2011

Ulli Beier

This weekend Ulli Beier died.

Reading through obituaries this morning and flicking through biographies I feel the loss not only of a pioneer of the art histories of non-Western cultures but a whole generation of intellectuals. Still, I wonder whether there still are those who like Ulli Beier who came to Nigeria in 1950 and deeply involved himself in the country’s then burgeoning creative scene, whether in this I could follow his example or whether I even should. He was instrumental in the foundation of the Mbari Artists and Writers Club in Ibadan and later the Mbari Mbayo in Osogbo as well as the magazine Black Orpheus. The Osogbo art workshops of 1964 (did I get that date right?) produced artists and artistic traditions that, again through his tireless promotion organising exhibitions, gained international reputation. And, as a German I have to mention his role in the foundation of the Iwalewa House at the University of Bayreuth that remains an important space for the promotion of non-Western arts in Germany (and for a moment almost tempted me to Bayreuth for my PhD). Maybe I am just idealising a past that, with hindsight, appears ripe with opportunities and creativity and overlooking its challenges and problems, especially when viewed through the current anxieties of my upcoming viva and applying for post-doctoral positions. Maybe. And, surely there are those I today admire for their work in Nigeria and across the continent. But, judging by the obituaries in Nigerian publications this was a man who – like is former wife Susanne Wenger who died two years ago - is still remembered for this contribution to contemporary Nigerian arts in the 1950s and 1960s and, judging by the obituaries (already here, here and here), is fondly remembered for his contribution beyond the small professional and academic world of contemporary Nigerian arts.

Respect. And, RIP.

P.S. Chika Okeke has published a lovely poem on his blog.

3 comments:

  1. Der Neue Wiesenbote: Gründungsdirektor des Iwalewa-Hauses ist im Alter von 89 Jahren gestorben. [http://www.wiesentbote.de/2011/04/05/gruendungsdirektor-des-iwalewa-hauses-ist-im-alter-von-89-jahren-gestorben/]

    The Nation: Osun, artists mourn German scholar Ulli Beier [http://thenationonlineng.net/web3/news/32829.html]

    Next: Tribute to Ulli Beier. [http://234next.com/csp/cms/sites/Next/Opinion/5687418-148/story.csp]

    Culture Mulchure: Death of a giant (blak soul white skin: Ulli Beier). [http://blogs.crikey.com.au/culture-mulcher/2011/04/05/death-of-a-giant-ulli-beier/]

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  2. My father, Gerald Moore who is aged 87, is still alove and kicking. He collaborated on many projects with Ulli Beier, including co-editing The Penguin Book of Modern African Poetry.He also wrote The Chosen Tongue and Twelve African Writers.

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  3. @ Anonymous:

    All the best for your father. Ranka ya dade. May he have many more healthy and productive years!

    And, wow. I love my parents dearly but I'm sometimes saddened that they can only tolerate but never quite share my excitement for African arts. I envy you ever so slightly.

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